Xbox Live is down for many (Update: It’s back up)

Xbox Live is down for many (Update: It’s back up)

5:09am, 3rd September, 2019
If you were trying to sneak in a quick game on Xbox Live during your Friday afternoon lunch break and found that you can’t get online: don’t worry, you’re not alone. While still says all things are good to go (Update: Microsoft’s status page has now caught up with the outage, and says that it’s impacting sign-ins, account creations and searches), reports are pouring in of an outage keeping many users from logging in. Microsoft acknowledged the problem on Twitter, saying that they’re “looking into it now.” Update, 2:30 PM: It’s back up! The status page shows all lights as green again, and a Microsoft spokesperson says that services have been fully restored. We're aware that some users are unable to sign in currently & our teams are looking into it now. We'll update when we have more info to share. Thanks for all the reports! — Xbox Support (@XboxSupport)
No Man’s Sky’s next update will let you explore infinite space in virtual reality

No Man’s Sky’s next update will let you explore infinite space in virtual reality

9:30pm, 25th March, 2019
No Man’s Sky just figured out a way to make a wildly absorbing space exploration game even more immersive. Announced during Sony’s first update, No Man’s Sky devotees will soon be able to explore an endless procedurally generated universe in virtual reality. Hello Games’ Sean Murray followed Sony’s news with a The VR update is part of , the development team’s latest extremely generous bundle of new content, doled out to existing players for free. No Man’s Sky’s virtual reality makeover will launch on PlayStation VR and Steam VR this summer. The VR update will bring enhance the first-person perspective of the existing game, allowing players to steer a starship using their thruster, reach into a bag to fetch their multitool and wave to fellow players meandering around the vastness of space. No Man's Sky Virtual Reality is not a separate mode. Anything that is possible in NEXT or any other update is ready and waiting in VR. — Sean Murray (@NoMansSky) While we don’t know all of the details yet, that experience will dovetail nicely with the forthcoming feature cluster known as No Man’s Sky Online, “a radical new social and multiplayer experience” for the at times isolated space sim. “No Man’s Sky Virtual Reality is not a separate mode, but the entire game brought to life in virtual reality,” Murray wrote in. According to Murray the update will offer “a true VR experience rather than a port.” You can get a glimpse of how this will look in a teaser video, though since much of it depicts normal gameplay, there’s plenty of surprise still in store. Assuming the game runs well enough, No Man’s Sky Virtual Reality will be a far cry from gimmicky VR games that lack true depth, offering one of the most expansive — if not the most expansive — VR experiences to date. No Man’s Sky fans should still keep an eye out — there’s for the Beyond update, which is shaping up to make the No Man’s Sky world more epic than anyone who played the game at launch could ever have hoped for. “By bringing full VR support, for free, to the millions of players already playing the game, No Man’s Sky will become perhaps the most-owned VR title when released,” Murray wrote. “We are excited for that moment when millions of players will suddenly update and be able to set foot on their home planets and explore the intricate bases they have built in virtual reality for the first time.”
Valve unveils new features and a new look for Steam in business update at GDC

Valve unveils new features and a new look for Steam in business update at GDC

7:13pm, 21st March, 2019
Valve announced big changes coming for its widely used Steam video game platform, including a new feature, Events; a new look for the application’s Library page; and its new Steam Link Anywhere software. The Bellevue, Wash.-based company made the announcements as part of its at the Game Developers Conference in San Francisco, conducted by Valve’s Tom Giardino, Kassidy Gerber, Aiden Kroll, and Ricky Uy. Events, a new feature for Steam which is headed for open beta “within the next couple months,” will be shown on a dedicated page in the Steam application. Any game in a user’s library that has an upcoming event will have that information pushed forward via the Events page in Steam, enabling developers and publishers to reach their players on Steam directly. Events can involve items such as tournaments, content patches, flash sales for games on a user’s wishlist, bonus periods (such as free weekends or in-game “holidays”), or livestreams, with a weekly roundup page for events that affect any games in a given user’s collection. Steam’s Library page is also receiving an overhaul, switching from the old mostly text-based screen to a more visual environment. Your friends list will now be directly incorporated into the new look, with your complete library shifted to the bottom of the screen in a box-art tileset reminiscent of Netflix’s streaming menu. The top of your library will list your most recently played games, with all of your current selection’s details available at a glance. An early mockup of the new look for Steam’s Library page. (Source: Official Valve asset) Steam Link Anywhere earlier this March. The software, currently in beta testing, allows users to stream games from a PC running their Steam account to other devices, via the discontinued Steam Link hardware or devices running the free Steam Link app. It supports the Steam Controller, as well as Bluetooth-enabled gamepads, keyboards, and mice. Other developer-focused updates on the Steam backend include Developer Homepages, which allow existing fans to track a favorite studio’s next release, and store-page broadcasting capability, which lets creators livestream their gameplay footage or someone else’s to prospective buyers. One of the themes of the presentation was highlighting Valve and Steam’s existing investment in their systems, for developers and players alike. According to Gerber, in 2018, through Steam, Valve delivered 13 exabytes (13 billion gigabytes) of installation and update data to its users, with 11 billion software updates delivered via their service. This was made possible via Valve building its own private gaming network with 30 points of presence and 125 relays on a global backbone connection. A slide from Valve’s presentation on Steam at the Game Developers’ Conference 2019. (Source: Valve, .) Steam’s presentation at this year’s GDC comes one day after ‘s keynote, in which Epic announced a murderer’s row of old and new games that will be exclusive to its new online storefront. This includes big titles such as Ubisoft’s The Division 2, Obsidian’s The Outer Worlds (which will debut on Steam a full year after its debut on Epic), and 4A Games’s Metro Exodus. The French developer Quantic Dream also surprised the market by announcing that it would be bringing three of its narrative-focused cinematic adventures, Heavy Rain, Beyond: Two Souls, and Detroit: Become Human, to the PC for the first time, all as Epic store exclusives. Epic is shaping up to become a major competitor to Steam in the digital games marketplace, placing an emphasis on delivering a huge lineup of exclusive titles, as well as giving its registered users a free game every two weeks. Steam’s response appears to focus on further developing its user experience and infrastructure, while highlighting the enormity and ubiquity of its current efforts; Epic may have a few games it doesn’t, the strategy seems to say, but look at everything you didn’t realize Steam was already doing for you.
No Man’s Sky has a big new update due out this summer

No Man’s Sky has a big new update due out this summer

11:03pm, 15th March, 2019
After a conspicuous stretch of silence ending with a mysterious on Thursday, No Man’s Sky creator Sean Murray revealed that another major free update is on the way. The new content, which is the first since last year’s Visions update, will hit the massive space exploration game this summer. The bundle of new content, called will tie together three different updates, though Murray is only giving up the details of one so far. The one we know about is something that Murray is calling “No Man’s Sky Online” which “includes a radical new social and multiplayer experience which empowers players everywhere in the universe to meet and play together” and weaves together three standalone updates into “a vision for something much more impactful.” No Man’s Sky BEYOND, a major free chapter, coming Summer 2019. With three updates in one:1) No Man's Sky Online2) ?3) ? We're working out butts off on something specialMore Info soon — Sean Murray (@NoMansSky) The short preview video doesn’t reveal much, but it shows a ship we haven’t seen before in what looks like either a reimagined space station (that would be nice!) or some kind of brand new multiplayer hub area. Murray emphasized that the multiplayer update wouldn’t add things from other major multiplayer games like microtransactions or subscriptions and that he has no intention of turning No Man’s Sky into an MMO. (Still, if a lot of people are playing online together in a massive world, isn’t it uh, kind of an MMO?) The blog post noted that the team would release more details on the other two big pieces of new content in the coming weeks. “These changes are an answer to how we have seen people playing since the release of NEXT, and is something we’ve dreamed of for a long time,” Murray added. After a very rough launch and its accompanying critical lambasting in 2016, No Man’s Sky’s team has consistently added huge free content updates to the game. That dedication to building out the world the development team initially promised has brought “millions” of new players into the fold and inspired a. That community will be happy to hear that according to his latest , Murray doesn’t intend to walk away from the game any time soon.